The Latest

(via planetaryswing)
Sep 2, 2014 / 1 note
Sep 2, 2014 / 2,724 notes

erikangstrom:

“Creating visual art is a talent and gift i have enjoyed all my life. it has evolved into a tool that i use to express my views and ideas. I paint people and paint about people. our complex nature fascinates me and therefore compels me to expressively tell our story. My work is African and celebrates the beauty and wealth running in the veins of her people. its in the subjects eyes, lips, skin tone/texture, dress, hair, that i draw inspiration from. the experience and stories we carry with us are the corner stones from which we mold a new identity. it is the human spirit that i aim to share in my art.”

-Loyiso Mkize, Artist, Cape Town, South Africa.

(via seeselfblack)

gaze-interrupted:


The plaque beneath the photos reads: 
“The neighbors were suspicious of her hairstyle”
Lorna Simpson (American, b. 1960).  Flipside, 1991. Two gelatin silver prints and engraved plastic plaque, diptych, edition 2/3, 51 1/2 x 70 inches overall . Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 2007.32. © Lorna Simpson 
Sep 2, 2014 / 49 notes

gaze-interrupted:

The plaque beneath the photos reads:

“The neighbors were suspicious of her hairstyle”

Lorna Simpson (American, b. 1960).  Flipside, 1991. Two gelatin silver prints and engraved plastic plaque, diptych, edition 2/3, 51 1/2 x 70 inches overall . Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. 2007.32. © Lorna Simpson 

(via blackwomynsvisualart)

blackwomynsvisualart:

Myra Greene
“Untitled,” from the character recognition series, 2004-2007.
 Ambrotype on Black glass. 
 3 by 4 inches. 
image credit: http://myragreene.com
Sep 2, 2014 / 85 notes

blackwomynsvisualart:

Myra Greene

Untitled,” from the character recognition series, 2004-2007.

 Ambrotype on Black glass.

 3 by 4 inches. 

image credit: http://myragreene.com

I have borrowed the term “appropriation” from Marxist theory. Marx (for instance, in Capital) used the word for the process through which capitalists, owners of the means of production, collect the value of the work of the workers, who do not control these means. The term appropriation has been borrowed into cultural studies and cultural anthropology, where it has been productively generalized from material appropriation to the case of symbolic appropriation. Examples have been identified especially in the arts and in music. Perhaps the best-known illustration is the theft by White impresarios and musicians of musical styles and even specific compositions by African Americans. This tradition of symbolic appropriation created some of the most important symbolic wealth of “American” – that is, White American – culture, from nineteenth-century minstrelsy to ragtime and jazz, through rhythm and blues and rock and roll to the current international fad for hip-hop music (Hall 1997). This appropriation had, of course, important material economic consequences, generating immense wealth for White entrepreneurs and artists who interpreted African American compositions, while leaving their creators in poverty and obscurity. This was possible because Whites controlled the institutions within which the symbolic resources of African American music could be converted into material resources: media markets, distribution networks, and legal and governmental institutions that enforce contracts, copyrights, and trademarks. African American musicians were marginal to these systems, and kept there by Jim Crow racism.
Jane H. Hill, “Linguistic Appropriation: The History of White Racism is Embedded in American English”  (via thenegrotude)

(via thenegrotude)

Sep 2, 2014 / 263 notes
Reparations are not a radical idea; they’re considered a basic tenet of social and political policy throughout the world. Why should America not pay reparations to the descendants of slaves who were brought to America against their will, used as slaves to build the Southern economy into a huge economic force, and then freed into a culture of further violence perpetrated against them? It’s not as though all that’s over now; if anything, the problem has grown within the cells and psyches of every generation since. America will continue to waste money on relatively limited fixes, until we buck up and pay this debt in a real way once and for all. Millions are indeed wasted if the billions we owe here are not paid. A Reparations Plan would provide a massive investment in educational and economic opportunities for African Americans— rendered as payment for a long overdue debt. Until that debt is paid, the cycle of violence that began in the 1600s and continues to this day will continue to haunt our psyche and disrupt our social good. It is time for America to atone for our past in both word and deed, and to heal our weary soul.
Sep 2, 2014 / 50 notes

Many of us cannot help looking because of what Susan Sontag has called “the perennial seductiveness of war.” It is a kind of rubbernecking, staring at the bloody aftermath of something that is not an act of God but of man. The effect, as Ms. Sontag pointed out in an essay in The New Yorker in 2002, is anything but certain.

“Making suffering loom larger, by globalizing it, may spur people to feel they ought to ‘care’ more,” she wrote. “It also invites them to feel that the sufferings and misfortunes are too vast, too irrevocable, too epic to be much changed by any local, political intervention.”

So now that war comes to us in real time, do we feel helpless or empowered? Do we care more, or will the ubiquity of images and information desensitize us to the point where human suffering loses meaning when it is part of a scroll that includes a video of your niece twerking? Oh, we say as our index finger navigates to the next item, another one of those.

As war becomes a more remote, mechanized activity, posts and images from the target area have significant value. When a trigger gets pulled or bombs explode, real people are often on the wrong end of it. And bearing witness to the consequences gives meaning to what we see.

Sep 2, 2014 / 330 notes
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Sep 2, 2014 / 4,147 notes

tranqualizer:

lucidstrike:

Black-Asian Solidarity

that gif gives me chills every time

(via apoemaboutmyrights)

I’m not gonna sit around and waste my precious divine energy trying to explain and be ashamed of things you think are wrong with me.

Esperanza Spalding (via sexual-feelings)

I need to be about this life…  New Year’s Resolution??

(via allofthesparkles)

(via apoemaboutmyrights)

Sep 2, 2014 / 40,149 notes
cocoanegra:

wow wow wow wow 
Sep 2, 2014 / 1,535 notes

cocoanegra:

wow wow wow wow 

Sep 2, 2014 / 100 notes

(via cocoanegra)

Sep 2, 2014 / 201 notes

theangrytherapist:

“I DON’T DO LUKEWARM”

Don’t waste your time on things that don’t make you feel something.  If people, relationships, objects, art, don’t move you, don’t move toward it.  If you do, you will eventually be lukewarm. 

Sep 2, 2014 / 45 notes